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Designed and taught by museum educators, these programs offer an activity-oriented approach to help students develop a deeper understanding of natural history. Students become scientists as they handle museum specimens, study live animals, and participate in interactive demonstrations. Each class is Frameworks-correlated. Also check out the Resources page for materials to complement your class visit. 

Classes are offered during the school year from September through June.

For grades Pre-K–K, K–2, 3–5, 4–6, 6–12

 

Pre-K–Kindergarten

Please contact us for more information about this small-group program.
Length: 30 minutes
Fee: $8.00 per student ($200 minimum per program) includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.

Please note: One chaperone per five students is required for grades K–8.
 

Welcome to the Forest

Who lives in a forest? What sights, smells, and noises make a forest special?  Young students will explore life in a New England forest through storytelling, movement activities and examination of real specimens of plants, animals, and fungi specimens.

Grades K–2

Times: 9:30 am, 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of Students: 50 maximum
Length: One hour
Fee: $8.00 per student ($200 minimum per program) includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.

Please note: One chaperone per five students is required for grades K–8.
 

Animal ABCs

On an imaginary walk through the forest, students will discover different animal groups and compare their differences and similarities. They will look at animals with and without backbones and then examine birds, reptiles, mammals, and amphibians to compare their life cycles and special characteristics that make each group unique.

Home Sweet Home

Students will take a tour of habitats around the globe and search for the creatures who call these places home. From lush rainforests to frozen tundra to scorching deserts, they will explore these fascinating environments and the unique adaptations that allow plants and animals to survive in challenging conditions.

Dig Into Fossils 

What are fossils and how do they form? What clues can they give us to life in the past? Students will become paleontologists as they answer these and other questions about fossils and prehistoric life from three different periods in Earth’s history.

 

Bug World!

(30 students maximum for this hands-on lab)
Through close observations of museum specimens and live animals, students will investigate the diverse world of insects, spiders and their relatives and discover the special features that allow them to live in varied habitats all over the world.

 

Grades 3–5

Times: 9:30 am, 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of Students: 50 maximum
Length: One hour
Fee: $8.00 per student ($200 minimum per program) includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.

Please note: One chaperone per five students is required for grades K–8.

 

Jaws and Claws

By comparing and contrasting a variety of predators, students will discover the specialized adaptations that allow them to find and capture their prey. They will examine the eyes, ears, teeth, and beaks that enable animals to successfully hunt fish, insects, mice, and clams.

Inside Skeletons 

(30 students maximum for this hands-on lab)
Starting with the human skeleton, students will investigate the functions of bones. By examining the skeletal structures of other animals, students will observe how these creatures’ bodies have become adapted for jumping, flying, and other lifestyles.


Rocks and Minerals

Students will become geologists as they explore the fascinating underground world of rocks and minerals. They will learn how scientists use color, heft, hardness, and other properties to identify minerals and discover the surprising uses of minerals around the home.

The Changing Earth

Students will explore rocks, fossils, and other specimens to uncover the geologic history of our region over the past 600 million years. They will discover how plate tectonics, weathering, erosion, and mountain building have all shaped New England’s landscape.

 

Forest Ecology

(30 students maximum for this hands-on lab)
By examining animal skulls, leaves, fungus, and other natural objects, students will investigate life in a New England forest.  From tiny insects to towering trees, from sun to soil, students will explore the connections between living and nonliving components of an ecosystem.

 

Minerals Lab

(30 students maximum for this hands-on lab)
Students will become geologists as they explore an amazing array of minerals in a lab-like setting. Using scientific tests and careful observations of properties such as color, hardness and magnetism, students practice identifying common minerals the way geologists do.


Sketchbook Naturalists: Bird Adaptations

Times: 9:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of students: 30 students maximum
Length: 2 hours
Fee: $11.00 per student ($275 minimum per program) includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.

Through careful observations and sketches, students will follow in the footsteps of great naturalists, learning science by studying natural objects. They will investigate the special features of a variety of bird groups to discover how these animals are adapted to their habitats.



Grades 4–6

Times: 9:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of students: 30 maximum
Length: Two hours
Fee: $11.00 per student ($275 minimum per program), includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.
Please note: One chaperone per five students is required for grades K–8. Contact us about requirements for older students.

 

Human Origins Lab

How did we become the brainy, social, bipedal creatures that we are today? Using the evidence shown in the skulls, bones and tools of our ancient human ancestors, students will explore the major physical and technological changes seen from Australopithecus to Homo sapiens.



Grades 6–12

Times: 9:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of students: 30 maximum
Length: Two hours
Fee: $11.00 per student ($275 minimum per program), includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.
Please note: One chaperone per five students is required for grades K–8. Contact us about requirements for older students.

 

New England’s Prehistoric Past

How has New England changed over the past 500 million years? By studying rocks, fossils, and living animals that provide the clues to ancient oceans, volcanoes, and ice ages, students will leave this lab with a better understanding of what New England looked like, who lived here, and how scientists know about these ancient environments.



Human Evolution

By comparing the skeletons and technology of human and non-human primates from Australopithecus to Homo sapiens students will see the evolutionary trends which led to the emergence of modern humans. Students will learn how skulls, teeth, hips, and other key features have evolved through time. 

 

Sketchbook Naturalists: Bird Adaptations

(Recommended for students up to 8th grade.)
Through careful observations and sketches students will follow in the footsteps of great naturalists, learning science by studying natural objects. They will investigate the special features of a variety of bird groups to discover how these animals are adapted to their habitats.

 

Climate Change

Times: 9:30 am, 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:30 pm
Number of students: 50 maximum
Length: One hour
Fee: $8.00 per student ($200 minimum per program), includes museum admission. One chaperone per five students free; $10.00 per additional adult chaperone.

Is our climate changing? How do we know? Using fossils, rocks and scientific data, students will investigate climate in two dramatically different periods of Earth’s history and compare it to today’s changing climate.

 

Exploring Evolution

Through examination of museum specimens, classroom discussion, and scientific reasoning, students will explore the evolutionary concepts of variation, inheritance, natural selection and artificial selection, that explain the biodiversity of life on Earth today.